Neuroscientists at the Allen Institute have moved one step closer to understanding the complete list of cell types in the brain. In the most comprehensive study of its kind to date, published today on the cover of the journal Nature, the researchers sorted cells from the cortex, the outermost shell and the cognitive center of the brain, into 133 different…
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One of the indisputable leaders in pediatric immunotherapy, Seattle Children’s hospital has begun a new approach to ridding kids of solid tumor cancer. The STRIvE-01 trial is currently recruiting children with solid tumor cancer that either couldn’t be cured or reoccurred, and what makes STRIvE-01 different from the many trials that have come before is that it targets solid tumors.…
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Dr. Matthias Stephan Named Allen Distinguished Investigator

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center immunobioengineer Dr. Matthias Stephan, who is developing the use of immune-cell-programming nanoparticles as a cancer treatment, has been named a 2018 Allen Distinguished Investigator by The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of the Allen Institute. He will use the three-year, $1.5 million award to help take the steps necessary to bring the approach to the clinic to…
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Therapeutic Strategies Targeting Connexins

The connexin family of channel-forming proteins is present in every tissue type in the human anatomy. Connexins are best known for forming clustered intercellular channels, structurally known as gap junctions, where they serve to exchange members of the metabolome between adjacent cells. In their single-membrane hemichannel form, connexins can act as conduits for the passage of small molecules in autocrine…
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Two UW Cardiologists Honored at Northwestern University

Dr. Daniel Yang was presented with the grand prize in the  Junior Faculty Basic Science category for his presentation titled “Novel Adult-Onset Systolic Cardiomyopathy due to MYH7 E848G Mutation in Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells“, receiving $10,000 to go towards cardiovascular research. Fellow Cardiologist, and ISCRM Faculty Member, Farid Moussavi-Harami was awarded 3rd place for his submission. The Jeremiah Stamler Distinguished Young Research Award was created to…
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Cancer treatments have improved astronomically in the past few decades. But as more patients overcome the disease, a different monster is rearing its head: financial toxicity. “Most people today think about quality of life around cancer and wonder: ‘How do I afford the medicines that will keep me alive?’” said Mark Alles, the CEO and president of biotech company Celgene, which…
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Our paper shows how brain chemistry relates to neural responses, and ultimately to how people perceive visual motion. Using MR spectroscopy, we can measure an index of glutamate, which is a neurotransmitter that affects brain activity. We showed that the amount of glutamate in a particular part of the brain that processes visual motion (called area MT) is related to the strength of the fMRI response (an index of neural activity)...
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Scientists at the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason (BRI) were recently awarded a one-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to build a Down syndrome (DS) biorepository to research the connection between autoimmune disease and DS. The BRI biorepository, or biobank, is a collection of blood, serum and tissue samples, as well as medical histories, from volunteers with…
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Researchers Identify New Way Skin Stops Tumor Growth

Cancer is so closely associated with DNA mutations that it seems almost inevitable that such changes must lead to cancer. But a square inch of skin can harbor tens of thousands of DNA changes and yet be tumor-free. How? Cells, as it happens, aren’t passive victims of DNA damage. When faced with what could be cancer-causing DNA alterations, some cells…
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