A Chinese researcher says his lab facilitated the first birth of gene-edited children — twin girls who are said to possess genetic alterations that could protect them from HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. “Two beautiful little Chinese girls, named Lulu and Nana, came crying into this world as healthy as any other babies a few weeks ago. The girls are home…
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Virginia Mason Was a Clinical Trial Site for New Peanut Allergy Medication

Virginia Mason served as a clinical trial site for a new oral medication awaiting federal approval that some officials say could be a game-changer for children and adolescents who suffer peanut allergy. Results of the clinical trials have been published by The New England Journal of Medicine. The clinical research program at Virginia Mason, in which Virginia Mason Medical Center physicians and Benaroya Research…
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With many disease-causing bacteria ratcheting up their shields against current drugs, new tactics are vital to protect people from treatment-resistant infections. Lowering mutation rates in harmful bacteria might be an as yet untried way to hinder the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens. This proposed strategy comes from recent findings in infectious disease research at UW Medicine in Seattle. The report on…
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This publication reports on the structural mechanism by methylated CpG motifs are maintained following DNA replication. Surprisingly, the DNA methylation reaction requires action by a ubiquitin E3 ligase, UHRF1. We show how a small domain in UHRF1 couples the recognition of a CpG site that requires methylation to the modification of histone H3 with ubiquitin, which in turn recruits the DNA methyltransferase, DNMT1. We show that known cancer-associated mutations in this domain of UHRF1 uncouple the recognition and modification reactions...
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Launching a clinical trial is a lot like leaping from an airplane, says Colette Chaney: “You’re scared, you’re exhilarated and you’re hoping for a positive outcome.” The longtime clinical research nurse would know. She’s stood in front of an open door on a plane, steeling herself to skydive. And she’s infused patients with revved-up T cells that had never before…
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There have been several breakthroughs using electrical stimulation to damaged nerves, but they have required surgeries to implant wires and stimulator inside the body. At the University of Washington, they are showing dramatic success with a much less invasive procedure. “In six months’ time, I flew over 150,000 miles. I snorkeled in the Red Sea, sat on the Great Wall…
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Dr. Sita Kugel Named 2018 V Scholar

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center pancreatic cancer researcher Dr. Sita Kugel has been named a 2018 V Scholar by the V Foundation for Cancer Research. The two-year, $200,000 award will support Kugel’s goal of developing a targeted therapy for an aggressive subtype of pancreatic cancer. “I am incredibly humbled and honored to receive this recognition from the V Foundation,” said Kugel, an assistant…
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Persistent HIV Infection Works a Lot like Cancer, Study Shows

Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle have strengthened the case that HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, may take a page from cancer’s playbook. The research led by Drs. Joshua Schiffer and Dan Reeves has significant implications for strategies to cleanse remaining reservoirs of HIV infection, which, if ever achieved, would amount to a functional cure for HIV. Their study, released…
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Seattle Genetics’ star cancer drug Adcetris has won Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of a fast-growing type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The approval comes after the drug showed better results in patients than the standard treatment for the cancer. This is the first time the FDA has approved a drug for treatment of newly diagnosed peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), and it…
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