By many standards, and certainly by the way the media covers it and industry promotes it, immuno-oncology therapies using CAR-T are revolutionizing cancer treatments. But what if, as the saying goes, they threw a revolution and nobody came? Or more precisely, what if they threw a revolution and no one was willing to pay for it? Because CAR-T seems to…
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Lake Union Life Science Building Lands Its First Tenant

 Lake Union life science building lands its first tenant. Alexandria Real Estate Equities Inc. has landed the first tenant at its four-story life science office building in Seattle’s Eastlake neighborhood and two other leases are pending, according to Newmark Knight Frank real estate broker Jesse Ottele. More prospective tenants are interested in the 205,000-square-foot waterfront building, which will feature a four-story atrium facing Lake Union when…
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Announcing the Recipients of the 2018 New Investigator Awards

The University of Washington/Fred Hutch Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) Developmental Core is delighted to announce the recipients of this year’s New Investigator Awards. The purpose of the CFAR New Investigator Award program is to provide support ($45-$55,000/year for 1-2 years) to promising early career HIV/AIDS investigators. The NIA encourages junior investigators to conduct independent research, acquire preliminary data to…
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The emerging form of cancer treatment called CAR T immunotherapy is wiping out the disease in some terminal patients — but despite early successes, the treatments still have major drawbacks. Many patients who take CAR T treatment also battle dangerous side effects, which can be deadly. For some patients, the treatments simply don’t work at all. But a new understanding of how…
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Human influenza virus rapidly accumulates mutations in its major surface protein hemagglutinin (HA). The evolutionary success of influenza virus lineages depends on how these mutations affect HA’s functionality and antigenicity. Here we experimentally measure the effects on viral growth in cell culture of all single amino acid mutations to the HA from a recent human H3N2 influenza virus strain. We…
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Humans’ ability to notice moving objects has always been a useful skill, from avoiding an animal predator in ancient times to crossing a busy street in the modern world. That evolutionary success attests to the importance of visual motion processing, and why there may be specialized regions of the brain specifically dedicated to this function,researchers say.  To shed light on…
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Improving Cancer Vaccines with T-Cell Programming Nanoparticles

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center immunobioengineer Dr. Matthias Stephan has received a 2018 Investigator’s Award in Cell and Gene Therapy for Cancer from the Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy to support the development of a combined T-cell programming, cancer-vaccine strategy to treat cancer. His proposed method, which unites nanoparticles that carry cancer vaccine–specific T-cell receptor genes with a vaccine designed to trigger an immune…
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Fred Hutch receives $1.26M grant to boost science-education efforts

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has received a $1.26 million, five-year Science Education Partnership Award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, or NIGMS. The award will fund a new science education and training program called “Frontiers in Cancer Research,” which will focus on: inspiring secondary school students from underrepresented communities to pursue biomedical and clinical research careers; developing and…
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The SET1/MLL family of histone methyltransferases is conserved in eukaryotes and regulates transcription by catalyzing histone H3K4 mono-, di-, and tri-methylation. These enzymes form a common five-subunit catalytic core whose assembly is critical for their basal and regulated enzymatic activities through unknown mechanisms. Here, we present the crystal structure of the intact yeast COMPASS histone methyltransferase catalytic module consisting of Swd1, Swd3,…
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For years now, experts have hammered this message home to students: If you want your pricey college degree to pay off, you should major in a STEM field— science, technology, engineering or math. A fresh release of higher-education data for Washington state shows just how well students have listened. The information from Washington’s Education Research & Data Centerreleased this month shows that the…
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