The new UW Life Sciences building is a model of environmentally responsible design, featuring 20-inch-deep solar fins and its own water recycling system. The building is currently LEED Gold certified, a globally recognized sustainability achievement. Perkins + Will, a local architecture and interior design firm, worked closely with the department of biology to make decisions about both form and function. “I think…
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My lab has been focused on programmed cell death, and on how the immune system reacts to dying cells. Much of that effort has focused on non-apoptotic forms of cell death, such as necroptosis and pyroptosis. These cell death programs are triggered by infection or stress, and are generally considered inflammatory and immunogenic. This is in contrast to apoptosis, which is a form of cell death that occurs during normal development and tissue homeostasis, and is generally immunologically silent, or...
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Calling all feverish, coughing, achy Seattleites: Your germs could help prevent the next big pandemic. At least, that’s the hope of a new project from the Brotman Baty Institute for Precision Medicine (BBI). The Seattle Flu Study will gather swabs from 10,000 resident schnozzes to better understand how contagious diseases spread in a community. Researchers have set up six kiosks around the city, where…
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Alveolar macrophages resident in the lung are prominent phagocytic effector cells of the pulmonary innate immune response, and paradoxically, are attractive harbors for pathogens. Consequently, facultative intracellular bacteria, such as Francisella tularensis, can cause severe systemic disease and sepsis, with high morbidity and mortality associated with pulmonary infection. Current clinical treatment, which involves exhaustive oral or intravenous antibiotic therapy, has…
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Institute for Systems Biology’s Professor Sui Huang, MD, PhD, has been announced by Cancer Research UK as a member of a global research team funded through its Grand Challenge competition — an international funding initiative that aims to answer some of the biggest questions facing cancer research. Grand Challenge brings together the brightest scientists from around the world and from different…
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Researchers at the Pacific Northwest Research Institute (PNRI) in Seattle and the University of Exeter in the U.K. have developed a new method of screening babies and adults for future risk of Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Called the T1D GRS2, this new method will be much more effective than current methods. It takes into account detailed genetic information known to…
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New Year, New Federal Policies for Clinical & Translational Research

Many researchers are tucking in to finish their first National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant proposals or IRB applications of the year. A number of changes to federal regulations and NIH policies relevant to clinical and translational research take effect in January 2019. The Common Rule has been a fundamental part of clinical and translational research for decades. This set…
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Over one million candidate regulatory elements have been identified across the human genome, but nearly all are unvalidated and their target genes uncertain. Approaches based on human genetics are limited in scope to common variants and in resolution by linkage disequilibrium. We present a multiplex, expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL)-inspired framework for mapping enhancer-gene pairs by introducing random combinations of…
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Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center led by Dr. Cyrus Ghajar recently uncovered promising new science in the battle against metastatic breast cancer. Their findings, published today in Nature Cell Biology, show that it’s possible to destroy cancer cells that can hide for years in people’s bone marrow. Chemotherapy is often effective at destroying fast-growing cells, but there’s a…
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