There are two main applications for this work. First, the scientists can use their models to engineer novel gene regulatory elements (specifically 5'UTRs). Second, they can use their model to predict which variants in the human genome result in changes in protein production. It's currently impossible to characterize every variant experimentally and having a model that allows us to identify those variants that have the largest impact is extremely useful for diagnostics applications.
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Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Marco Rubio (R-FL), and Jack Reed (D-RI) introduced a resolution yesterday (July 15) calling for global collaboration in developing guidelines for the use of gene editing technologies in the context of reproduction. The senators specifically pledge their support for the international commission established in May by the US National Academy of Medicine, the US National Academy of…
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A molecular test, proven more effective than thick blood smears at detecting malaria parasites earlier in an infection, has now received Food and Drug Administration qualification for certain types of clinical trials.  This move, one of the first of its kind for a malaria biomarker, is important for efforts to develop vaccines and better drugs against the tropical disease. The…
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Johnson & Johnson today announced that Janssen Vaccines & Prevention B.V., one of its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies, together with a consortium of global partners are preparing to launch Mosaico, the first large-scale Phase 3 efficacy study of Janssen’s investigational mosaic-based HIV-1 preventive vaccine. Janssen’s mosaic vaccine is designed as a global vaccine with the goal of preventing infections from the…
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It matters that the first patients were identical twins. Nancy and Barbara Lowry were six years old, dark-eyed and dark-haired, with eyebrow-skimming bangs. Sometime in the spring of 1960, Nancy fell ill. Her blood counts began to fall; her pediatricians noted that she was anemic. A biopsy revealed that she had a condition called aplastic anemia, a form of bone-marrow…
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The Washington State Academy of Sciences (WSAS) is pleased to announce 24 new members, recognizing their outstanding record of scientific and technical achievement and their willingness to work on behalf of the Academy to bring the best available science to bear on issues within the state of Washington. The 2019 class of new members is composed of 17 new elected…
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ISCRM Researchers to Play Pivotal Roles on NIH-Funded Collaboration with Stanford

Over the last decade, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have become powerful tools of discovery for scientists around the world. Essentially, iPSC technology involves reprogramming adult cells to an early developmental state in which they once again have the potential to become any other type of cell, enabling researchers to study normal biological processes, model diseases, and screen for…
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One doctor says it’s becoming the “Wild West” of medicine. Private clinics are opening nationwide claiming stem cells will cure everything from arthritis to macular degeneration, autism to erectile dysfunction. The Food and Drug Administration says many of those claims are just not true. Norman Wohlken found out the hard way. His osteoarthritis makes walking painful. He read an ad for…
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The American Society of Hematology will honor Dr. Phil Greenberg of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center with the 2019 E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize for his outstanding contributions to the field of immunotherapy. The honor recognizes pioneering research achievements in hematology that represent a paradigm shift or significant discovery in the field, according to an ASH press release. Fittingly, the lectureship and…
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