A molecular test, proven more effective than thick blood smears at detecting malaria parasites earlier in an infection, has now received Food and Drug Administration qualification for certain types of clinical trials.  This move, one of the first of its kind for a malaria biomarker, is important for efforts to develop vaccines and better drugs against the tropical disease. The…
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Johnson & Johnson today announced that Janssen Vaccines & Prevention B.V., one of its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies, together with a consortium of global partners are preparing to launch Mosaico, the first large-scale Phase 3 efficacy study of Janssen’s investigational mosaic-based HIV-1 preventive vaccine. Janssen’s mosaic vaccine is designed as a global vaccine with the goal of preventing infections from the…
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ISCRM Researchers to Play Pivotal Roles on NIH-Funded Collaboration with Stanford

Over the last decade, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have become powerful tools of discovery for scientists around the world. Essentially, iPSC technology involves reprogramming adult cells to an early developmental state in which they once again have the potential to become any other type of cell, enabling researchers to study normal biological processes, model diseases, and screen for…
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Microsoft is teaming up with leading medical research organizations to create a shared network of research data in the Pacific Northwest. Dubbed the Cascadia Data Discovery Initiative (CDDI), the goal of the collaboration is simple: make it easier to find and share medical data. For example, researchers at one of the institutions should be able to easily locate relevant data at…
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It’s possible to take precancerous cells back in time, so to speak, revealing individual DNA mutations in their earliest state and the likely sequence in which those mutations were acquired, according to scientists in Seattle. “When a blood draw or biopsy detects a precancerous condition, that is the first recognition that something’s wrong,” Doulatov said. “But if we think of cancer as genetically driven process that evolves over time, the molecular-level DNA mutations that caused the diagnosis very likely began years earlier. We wondered: Can we go back in history and figure out how a particular tumor evolved?”
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The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded Geisinger, along with the University of Washington in Seattle and Washington University in St. Louis, a $5.8 million, five-year grant to study the role of genetics in neuropsychiatric disorders. Researchers will recruit patients with known genetic causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Teams will then conduct in-depth genomic…
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Sequencing a genome is getting cheaper, but making sense of the resulting data remains hard. Researchers have now found a new way to extract useful information out of sequenced DNA. By cataloging subtle evolutionary signatures shared between pairs of genes in bacteria, the team was able to discover hundreds of previously unknown protein interactions. This method is now being applied to the…
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For 60 years, women have had the power to prevent unplanned pregnancy — and the responsibility for contraception was firmly placed on them. From the pill to the coil to the implant and modern fertility apps such as Natural Cycles, dozens of contraceptives have been developed for women, while for men the options have remained limited and rather old-fashioned: condoms…
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Meet Regina Wu, a Seattle-based biologist who works to bring science to the classrooms across Washington state. What do you do? I’m a curriculum designer and educator at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. I partner with teachers and scientists to translate groundbreaking research into labs and lessons for the classroom. As a program manager for the Hutch’s Science Education Partnership, I work…
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Kristin Anderson has already fought cancer in more ways than one. She’s a cancer survivor whose battle with breast cancer started when she was just 28 years old and pursuing a doctorate in immunology. And as a researcher at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, she’s investigating ways to use our body’s own immune system to attack solid tumors. But Anderson…
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