Institute for Systems Biology’s Professor Sui Huang, MD, PhD, has been announced by Cancer Research UK as a member of a global research team funded through its Grand Challenge competition — an international funding initiative that aims to answer some of the biggest questions facing cancer research. Grand Challenge brings together the brightest scientists from around the world and from different…
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Researchers at the Pacific Northwest Research Institute (PNRI) in Seattle and the University of Exeter in the U.K. have developed a new method of screening babies and adults for future risk of Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Called the T1D GRS2, this new method will be much more effective than current methods. It takes into account detailed genetic information known to…
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New Year, New Federal Policies for Clinical & Translational Research

Many researchers are tucking in to finish their first National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant proposals or IRB applications of the year. A number of changes to federal regulations and NIH policies relevant to clinical and translational research take effect in January 2019. The Common Rule has been a fundamental part of clinical and translational research for decades. This set…
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Over one million candidate regulatory elements have been identified across the human genome, but nearly all are unvalidated and their target genes uncertain. Approaches based on human genetics are limited in scope to common variants and in resolution by linkage disequilibrium. We present a multiplex, expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL)-inspired framework for mapping enhancer-gene pairs by introducing random combinations of…
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Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center led by Dr. Cyrus Ghajar recently uncovered promising new science in the battle against metastatic breast cancer. Their findings, published today in Nature Cell Biology, show that it’s possible to destroy cancer cells that can hide for years in people’s bone marrow. Chemotherapy is often effective at destroying fast-growing cells, but there’s a…
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Secret to Sepsis May Lie in Rare Cell

In a paper published in Nature Immunology, scientists from Seattle Children’s Research Institute reveal how a rare group of white blood cells called basophils play an important role in the immune response to a bacterial infection, preventing the development of sepsis. Researchers say their findings could lead to better ways to prevent the dangerous immune response that strikes more than 30 million…
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Scientists Learn How Common Virus Reactivates after Transplantation

A new study in Science challenges long-held theories of why a common virus — cytomegalovirus, or CMV — can reactivate and become a life-threatening infection in people with a compromised immune system, including blood cancer patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. The discovery, to be published in Science’s Jan. 18 issue, used a newly developed mouse model and could pave the way for…
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A study of 84 twin/sibling pairs exposed to alcohol in utero shows that two fetuses exposed to identical levels of alcohol can experience strikingly different levels of neurological damage.  Risk of damage does not depend solely on the pregnant woman’s alcohol consumption; rather, fetal genetics plays a vital role, according to findings published today in the journal Advances in Pediatric Research. “The evidence is conclusive,” said lead author…
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ITHS Announces Recipients of $280K in Pilot Award Funding

This year, awardees will tackle research challenges ranging from alternative treatments for the opioid epidemic through health related applications in mobile technology. The Institute of Translational Health Sciences offers annual pilot awards for novel, innovative, and collaborative clinical research. Our three largest funding mechanisms are awarded annually to launch new translational methods, establish new multidisciplinary partnerships, and encourage researchers to…
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