The Madrona Venture Group recently awarded the Madrona prize to the UW CSEEmbarker project team. The Embarker project uses machine learning to identify disease markers of Alzheimer’s that can help researchers develop treatments. Alzheimer’s is a progressive brain disorder and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. There is no cure for Alzheimer’s, and no treatment can prevent its progression. Existing treatments…
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‘Exciting’ but Early Results in Trial of Immunotherapy for Myeloma

The 11 patients had already received treatment after treatment for their cancers, some as many as 20 different courses of therapy. Yet their myelomas, almost all classified by doctors as “high risk,” kept coming back. Their options faded away. Then they joined a clinical trial to be the first people ever to receive a new experimental, immune-harnessing therapy, whose design includes features…
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Our lab studies DNA break repair and genetic recombination in bacteria (E. coli) and fission yeast (S. pombe) using both genetic and biochemical methods.  When their DNA is broken, cells must repair it or they die.  Successful repair often employs homologous recombination, the generation of new combinations of gene alleles that provide the diversity for evolution to proceed efficiently.  During sex cell formation (meiosis) DNA is programmed to be broken...
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Imagine microscopic Lego blocks perfectly snapping together to form long, tube-like structures. This is not the latest kids toy –– it is a self-assembling protein filament made completely by technology. For the first time, researchers at the UW Baker Lab developed self-assembling protein filaments, a key component of cell cytoskeletons, using a computer program known as Rosetta. The possibilities for the new filaments…
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‘Cautiously Optimistic’ About HIV Vaccines

When World AIDS Day was first observed 30 years ago, Dr. Larry Corey was already in the thick of it, a scientific leader in the struggle to tame a pandemic that has now taken 35.4 million lives. Today, the former president and director of Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center continues to lead international efforts to stop HIV/AIDS, focused on the search…
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Two University of Washington researchers are among the 416 new fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, announced in November. Election as a fellow of the AAAS is an honor bestowed upon members by their peers, in recognition of their efforts to advance science or its applications. Terrance Kavanagh, a UW professor of environmental and occupational health sciences in…
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Brain-computer interfaces have the potential to give patients better and more natural control over their prosthetic devices. Through this method, a chip in a patient’s brain picks up a thought — neural activity triggered by focusing on specific visual imagery — to move a joint and then transmits that signal to the prosthetic. This technology is not widely available yet,…
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Dr. James Yurkovich joined ISB this summer as a Translational Research Fellow. The three-year Translational Research Fellows Program provides a unique opportunity for bench-to-bedside translational research with mentorship from experts in systems biology and clinical research. Read on for a Q&A with Yurkovich that delves into his research interests, future aspirations, hobbies, and much more.  How has your experience as a Translational…
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One major focus of our research is to understand the role of selective protein destruction in eukaryotic biology and human diseases. Just like protein synthesis, protein degradation is tightly controlled in all eukaryotic organisms and is frequently involved in the regulation of diverse cellular functions. We are interested in dissecting how different cellular signals induce specific protein degradation in human cells, thereby, mediating various biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, tissue differentiation, stress response, and circadian rhythm...
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