Clocks, Cancer, and Chronochemotherapy

The core of the mammalian circadian clock mechanism is a time-delayed transcription-translation feedback loop (TTFL), which influences the transcription and expression of a large fraction of the transcriptome. Through this mechanism, the mammalian circadian clock modulates many physiological functions, including the timing of cell division and rates of metabolism in specific tissues. Circadian clock dysfunction is associated with several human…
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AGC Biologics, a leading global Biopharmaceutical Contract Development and Manufacturing Organization (CDMO), is the first manufacturer of Orchard Therapeutics’ Libmeldy™, which was recently approved by the European Commission (EC) as a one-time therapy for eligible patients with early-onset Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD). The EC has granted full (standard) market authorization for Libmeldy™ (autologous CD34+ cells encoding the ARSA gene), a lentiviral…
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UW Medicine investigators are starting volunteer enrollment for an investigational COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial. The Phase III study will examine whether the Novavax vaccine candidate can protect against SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus responsible for COVID-19. UW Medicine’s site for enrolling participants is the Virology Research Clinic at Harborview Medical Center’s Ninth and Jefferson Building.  The site will enroll up to 1,000…
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Just as the COVID-19 pandemic dominated our lives in 2020, it was a huge focus for many researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and around the world. That focus is likely to continue in 2021, but the increasing availability of vaccines means our experts forecast a positive shift in the course of the pandemic in the coming year. With that hopeful outlook as a foundation, we talked to…
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The holiday season is upon us, and as research begins to slow towards the end of the year, we too will be taking a short break to prepare for the new year ahead. The Science in Seattle website will be dark for the remainder of the holiday season, but will return as your source for local life science news on January 4th!
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These Visual Neurons Catch What We Might Miss

With the sun setting earlier in the winter months, you may be walking your dog or taking a post-work jog in the dark. On one of these neighborhood strolls, you may round a corner and be startled to see another nighttime walker in your path. Without thinking about it, your brain will cue you into that faint presence so you…
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Moderna Inc. applied Nov. 30, 2020, to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for emergency authorization of its investigational COVID-19 vaccine known as mRNA-1273. This follows the release of preliminary results from a phase 3 trial, which found the vaccine was safe and effective at preventing symptomatic COVID-19 in adults. A full review of the data has now confirmed these…
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Single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) has become an essential tool for characterizing gene expression in eukaryotes but current methods are incompatible with bacteria. Here, we introduce microSPLiT, a high-throughput scRNA-seq method for gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria that can resolve heterogeneous transcriptional states. We applied microSPLiT to >25,000 Bacillus subtilis cells sampled at different growth stages, creating an atlas of changes in metabolism and lifestyle.…
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Engineering chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) helps create disease-specific T cells for targeted therapy, but the cost and rigor associated with manufacturing engineered T cells ex vivo can be prohibitive, so programing T cells in vivo may be a viable alternative. Here we report an injectable nanocarrier that delivers in vitro-transcribed (IVT) CAR or TCR mRNA…
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Just as the COVID-19 pandemic forced the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology to go virtual to keep its 30,000 participants safe, it threw up roadblocks to research in labs and clinics. But the 3,500 research abstracts presented at the virtual meeting proved that the coronavirus couldn’t stop science altogether. The 62nd ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition, held online from Dec. 5 through Dec. 8, featured presentations on the latest discoveries in blood cancers like leukemia, lymphoma and…
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