The UW/Fred Hutch Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) is delighted to announce this year’s Mentored International Investigator Awardee. The Mentored International Investigator Awards are to encourage international junior investigators (at an advanced stage of training or recently independent) to conduct independent research with close mentorship from senior faculty. This research should ultimately lead to acquiring preliminary data to obtain funding to…
Read More
Because of the very substantial risk of metastatic spread, baseline imaging should be performed in all patients with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), including those without palpable lymph nodes, according to results of an analysis of a large MCC registry presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. The results were a “surprise,” according to Neha Singh, a…
Read More

Tuberculosis: Fighting the Disease with a Single Vial

Vaccinations have begun in a phase I human clinical trial testing a freeze-dried, temperature-stable formulation of an experimental tuberculosis vaccine candidate. Nikki Withers speaks to Dr Daniel Hoft and Christopher Fox about the formulation process and what this means for vaccine development going forward. Currently, the only Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccine for TB is Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). It is…
Read More
Doctor Rebecca Partridge‘s son was born with Down Syndrome in 2002. When she wasn’t able to find the specialized care he needed, she began Virginia Mason’s Down Syndrome Program. The program provides primary care, healthcare maintenance, and other vital forms of care in one convenient setting. The Down Syndrome program is also working with the Benaroya Research Institute to research the connection…
Read More
UW Medicine researchers are recruiting pregnant women to study whether prenatal marijuana use – in the absence of alcohol, tobacco, and any illicit drug consumption – affects their infants’ brain development, cognitive and motor development, medical health, and social behavior. The “Moms + Marijuana” study is co-led by Drs. Natalia Kleinhans and Stephen Dager, radiologists at the University of Washington School of Medicine.…
Read More
Blaze Bioscience, a Seattle-based biotech company that’s using a protein borrowed from scorpion venom to make cancerous tumors glow, has passed its first clinical trial with flying colors and is on to the next stage. Blaze’s “tumor paint” technology, called BLZ-100 or tozuleristide, helps surgeons spot and remove solid tumor cells in patients. It works by combining a fluorescent dye…
Read More

Synthetic Bistability and Differentiation in Yeast

Engineered systems that control cellular differentiation and pattern formation are essential for applications like tissue engineering, biomaterial fabrication, and synthetic ecosystems. Synthetic circuits that can take on multiple states have been made to engineer multicellular systems. However, how to use these states to drive interesting cellular behavior remains challenging. Here, we present a cellular differentiation program involving a novel synthetic…
Read More
The leaders of the White House Office of Science and Technology, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Department of Energy’s science division have formed a committee “to address issues facing the U.S. research community,” President Donald Trump’s administration announced yesterday (May 6). “Our Nation’s continued global leadership in science and technology depends upon…
Read More
Read the Publication This week we profile a recent publication in Nature Communications from the laboratory of Dr. Luis Ceze at the University of Washington School of Computer Science and Engineering. Can you provide a brief overview of your lab’s current research focus? Our lab explores the intersection of computing and biotech for new applications. Our current flagship project is…
Read More
Scientists everywhere are struggling with data. As more and more new technologies come on the scene, researchers’ ability to generate and store massive datasets is on the rise. But doing something with that data is a different question. It’s a massive engineering challenge to package, store and present biological data so that other scientists can use it to glean new…
Read More