Nearly three years into his administration, President Trump has reestablished the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology Policy (PCAST), an influential group of scientists and engineers that advises the White House on policy issues related to science, technology, and innovation. However, the first round of appointments — which was dominated by industry representatives — raises questions about what role PCAST…
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In what could be an exceptionally personal form of identity theft, University of Washington researchers have determined that a popular genealogy website is vulnerable to security risks which could compromise the information people share about their genetic makeup. In findings posted on Tuesday, UW scientists looked into GEDmatch, a third-party site where users can compare their DNA sequences to others who have…
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The authors have conducted the first-ever histological and molecular analyses of the developing human cerebellum, and found that there are many stark differences in developmental patterns between the mouse and human cerebellum. For example, they have identified cerebellar progenitors have never been described in any other vertebrate. The findings underline that human developmental studies are essential to define human biology.
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In pursuit of changing the course of Alzheimer’s, support is growing to explore new avenues that might unlock mysteries of this brain disease. This includes investigating the link between aging eyes and aging brains. Cecilia Lee, an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Washington School of Medicine, recently received a $17.2 million grant from the National Institute on…
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Dan Toloudis has spent his career designing graphics tools for computer animators. In previous graphics engineering jobs, he wrote programs that enabled artists to create lifelike dragons at DreamWorks Animation or spinning cars for a digital Ford commercial. Now he spends his days thinking about human cells. Toloudis is one of the engineers behind AGAVE, a new graphics tool developed at…
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The Infectious Disease Research Institute (IDRI) announced the award of a groundbreaking multi-year contract from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The goal of the contract, which may total up to $44.8 million over seven years if all contract options are exercised, is to comprehensively identify the complex immune…
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The authors provide some of the first evidence that large copy-number changes that originated in archaic hominins have played an important role in helping our ancestors adapt to new environments as they spread out across the globe. They showed that these ancient duplications carry duplicated genes that are specific to different human populations and absent in others where ancestral interbreeding did not occur.
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For the third year in a row, the University of Washington has won the title of the world’s most innovative public university, according to an annual ranking by Reuters and Clarivate Analytics. The institution also ranked No. 5 among all universities, public and private, with Stanford taking the top spot. The list considered factors including patent filings and research paper citations to…
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The cytokine IL-2 is a critical regulator of immune homeostasis The authors found that, despite substantially reduced IL-2 sensitivity, regulatory T cells maintained selective IL-2 signaling and prevented immune dysregulation following treatment with PC61, even when CD25hi cells were depleted. These findings demonstrate that even with severely curtailed CD25 function, Treg cells retain their selective access to IL-2 in vivo, and this is sufficient to maintain normal Treg cell function and immune homeostasis
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The baby boomer generation is known for their resilience, as well as their ability to innovate, so it should be no surprise that many members of this creative group went on to develop some inspiring biotech advances. The baby boomers, usually born between 1945 and 1964 (although the dates vary based on which survey you reference) have done some noteworthy…
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