Four BioE Undergrads Co-Author Exosomes Paper

The pandemic has made life difficult for most people, but it also has created some interesting opportunities. Because UW students couldn’t attend classes in person in 2020 and 2021, those in science majors were unable to work in labs. Students missed opportunities to further their education and gain hands-on experience. However, two UW professors came up with a clever way…
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Immunomic Therapeutics, a privately-held clinical-stage biotechnology company pioneering the study of LAMP (Lysosome Associated Membrane Protein)-mediated nucleic acid-based immunotherapy, announced the dosing of the first patient in the company’s Phase 1 study evaluating ITI-3000, a plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine targeting patients with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare but aggressive form of skin cancer that is typically caused by the…
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What are three characteristics necessary to identify subtypes of cancer from cell-free DNA? The ability to solve difficult genetic computational problems, a high level of enthusiasm for translational cancer research, and a passion for improving the outcomes for cancer patients. University of Washington M.D-Ph.D. candidate Anna-Lisa Doebley has all three. And more. Doebley, 29, grew up in Wisconsin and has…
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Scientists have developed artificial intelligence software that can create proteins that may be useful as vaccines, cancer treatments, or even tools for pulling carbon pollution out of the air. This research, reported today in the journal Science, was led by the University of Washington School of Medicine and Harvard University. The article is titled “Scaffolding protein functional sites using deep learning.”…
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The authors' work contributes to a growing research body on mucosal tissue regulatory T cells (Tregs), demonstrating that the previously uncharacterized genitourinary tract (GU)-localized Treg population is phenotypically and functionally distinct from canonical counterparts and may perform location-specific duties. As they are localized in a barrier tissue where pathogens may enter the body, GU tract (and other mucosa-localized) Tregs have large implications for the design of vaccines for sexually transmitted infections: mucosal vaccines aim to elicit robust anti-STI responses in local immune cells, so it is important to consider how Tregs may influence vaccine-induced immune responses.
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Grant for Escobar Lab Funds AML Research

This year in the United States, more than 60,000 children and adults will be diagnosed with leukemia, a family of blood cancers that claim more than 22,000 lives annually. While the outlook is relatively promising for younger people, five-year survival rates for adult patients with a more aggressive form of cancer, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), is only about 25%. The…
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Alpenglow Biosciences, developers of an innovative end-to-end 3D spatial biology platform, have announced a partnership with CorePlus, a high complexity CLIA-certified clinical and anatomic pathology laboratory, to digitize and analyze tissues in 3D to deliver novel spatial biology insights and accelerate drug development. As part of the partnership, CorePlus will invest an undisclosed sum into Alpenglow and receive access to…
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Although Omicron subvariants of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic coronavirus have evolved to evade antibody responses from the primary COVID-19 vaccine series, a new laboratory study suggests current vaccine boosters may elicit sufficient immune protection against severe Omicron-induced COVID-19 disease. The project assessed a comprehensive panel of vaccines available in the United States and around the world, as well as immunity acquired…
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The authors found that TOLLIP, a gene associated with TB susceptibility, influences dendritic cell maturation, cytokine responses to M. tuberculosis ligands, and T cell activation in human cohorts. Using mice lacking the TOLLIP gene, they found that lung-resident dendritic cells also develop deiminished maturation during M. tuberculosis infection irrespective of bacterial burden or lung microenvirontment. Further, these mice develop diminished M. tuberculosis-specific T cell responses after infection, which is a critical component of an effective immune response to TB. Moreover, mice lacking TOLLIP did not induce T cell responses to the current vaccine against TB, Bacille Calmette-Guerin. These data suggest that TOLLIP alters dendritic cell activity in ways that impaire adaptive immune responses to TB in both mice and humans, and that understanding how this protein works may provide insight into improved vaccines and treatments.
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As scientists catalog the microbial life living inside our gut, on our skin and in every nook and cranny of our body, disease researchers are hoping to use this collection of creatures — our microbiome — to find better ways to prevent, detect and treat cancer. We talked with researchers at Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center who are combining data…
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