More than a dozen area tech and biotech companies are supporting Fred Hutch Obliteride this year to help accelerate the lifesaving work at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Amazon, Microsoft, Seattle Genetics, Juno, Blue Nile and Lyft are a few of the companies helping sponsor the event and have rallied large teams of employees to participate and fundraise. Other companies including Adaptive Technologies,…
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The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has named Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center’s Dr. Jay F. Sarthy as one of five outstanding young scientists to receive the prestigious Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Award. He will receive $231,000 over four years to study pediatric brain cancers. Under the mentorship of geneticist Dr. Steven Henikoff and pediatric neuro-oncologist Dr. Jim Olson of the Hutch, Sarthy will aim…
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Iodide Improves Outcome After Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rats and Pigs

In this study, we tested whether iodide would reduce heart damage in rat and pig models of acute myocardial infarction as a risk analysis for a human trial. Acute myocardial infarction was induced by temporary ligation of the coronary artery followed by reperfusion. Iodide was administered orally in rats or IV in rats and pigs just prior to reperfusion. Damage was assessed by blood…
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Five years ago, IDRI (Infectious Disease Research Institute) moved into a state-of-the-art lab at 1616 Eastlake Avenue East, which is owned and operated by Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Inc. (NYSE: ARE), in the heart of Seattle’s growing South Lake Union life sciences hub. Today, the IDRI-Alexandria partnership continues as IDRI is hosts a summer intern from the University of Washington’s…
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Grab your litter scoopers, folks — there might just be valuable scientific data in your cat’s poop. That was certainly the case for Lil Bub, one of the original internet cat celebrities. These days, Bub is using her fame to further a huge host of causes, including learning more about the bacteria floating around inside animal’s digestive systems. Phase Genomics, a Seattle-based…
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Dr. Stanley Gartler was born on June 9, 1923, in Los Angeles, California to Romanian immigrant parents. During WWII, he flew combat with the 9th Air Force as a radio operator and machine gunner. Having an early interest in agriculture, Gartler worked on a farm after earning his undergraduate degree at UCLA and studied genetic plant breeding in graduate school…
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Scientific research breakthroughs are often achieved when many different scientists, in different labs and organizations, work together on a single task. That happened at the turn of the 21st century with the Human Genome Project, where human DNA was mapped for future reference and is now key to many breakthroughs in medicine. This is happening again, with a similarly visionary…
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A discovery about bacterial physics could point to a new way to develop antibiotics. The finding is likely to apply to approximately half of the world’s bacteria — potentially including antibiotic-resistant strains — said K.C. Huang, Ph.D., senior author on the study, which was published today in the journal Nature. Huang and his colleagues found that the outer layer of E. coli behaves very…
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A Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Effector Alters Phagosomal Maturation to Promote Intracellular Growth of Francisella

Many pathogenic intracellular bacteria manipulate the host phago-endosomal system to establish and maintain a permissive niche. The fate and identity of these intracellular compartments is controlled by phosphoinositide lipids. By mechanisms that have remained undefined, a Francisella pathogenicity island-encoded secretion system allows phagosomal escape and replication of bacteria within host cell cytoplasm. Here we report the discovery that a substrate…
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