Adam Lacy-Hulbert

Viewing images of diseased cells on a computer screen means limited detail and restricted angles, prohibiting researchers from fully analyzing specimens.

So researchers from Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason (BRI)—a Seattle-based research organization—are taking a different approach.

For more than a year, BRI researchers have used virtual reality (VR) tools to conduct detailed experiments about autoimmune and immune system diseases.

Adam Lacy-Hulbert, PhD, an associate member at BRI, explained in an interview with R&D Magazine how the research lab is utilizing virtual reality platforms to both speed up and enhance the research process.