A recent study of over 1,000 healthy women with no symptoms of urinary tract infections showed nearly 9 percent carried multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli strains in their guts. This is of clinical concern because disease-causing E. coli bacteria can transfer from the digestive tract to the female urinary tract via the urethra, the urine duct, which is shorter and positioned…
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Cassie Bryan’s success at crafting a protein that worked as she intended was a long time coming. When it finally happened, after six long years, she hit the bar and celebrated with beers — and a karaoke rendition of Joan Jett’s ‘Bad Reputation’. Bryan joined the protein-design laboratory of David Baker in 2012 as a graduate student at the University…
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When Dr. Susan Bullman last year told her husband, Dr. Christopher Johnston, that she wanted to leave her job at Harvard’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for a faculty post at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, he was, well, less than enthused. “We are not moving to Seattle, we’re not leaving Boston. My research is notgoing to the rain,” was his response, Johnston recalled with…
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Cancer Cells Reconnect with Their Inner Child to Evade Immunotherapy

Reconnecting with a gene from a long-forgotten youth may help adult tumor cells fly under the immune system’s radar, according to work from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center published Thursday in the journal Developmental Cell. A team of scientists found that a gene called DUX4 — usually turned on just after an egg is fertilized — allows tumor cells to become invisible…
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A Stroke of Genius

Strokes come in many shapes and sizes. In children and adults, strokes often present sudden limb or facial numbness, confusion and dizziness. But some strokes that cause clots to develop in the small blood vessels of the brain don’t exhibit any symptoms at all. Studies have shown that hundreds to thousands of these small, asymptomatic strokes, known as microinfarcts, likely occur over…
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For female mosquitoes, finding their next meal is all about smelling and seeing. Through behavioral experiments and real-time recording of the female mosquito brain, a team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of Washington, has discovered how the mosquito brain integrates signals from two of its sensory systems — visual and olfactory — to identify, track and hone…
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A molecular test, proven more effective than thick blood smears at detecting malaria parasites earlier in an infection, has now received Food and Drug Administration qualification for certain types of clinical trials.  This move, one of the first of its kind for a malaria biomarker, is important for efforts to develop vaccines and better drugs against the tropical disease. The…
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Johnson & Johnson today announced that Janssen Vaccines & Prevention B.V., one of its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies, together with a consortium of global partners are preparing to launch Mosaico, the first large-scale Phase 3 efficacy study of Janssen’s investigational mosaic-based HIV-1 preventive vaccine. Janssen’s mosaic vaccine is designed as a global vaccine with the goal of preventing infections from the…
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ISCRM Researchers to Play Pivotal Roles on NIH-Funded Collaboration with Stanford

Over the last decade, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have become powerful tools of discovery for scientists around the world. Essentially, iPSC technology involves reprogramming adult cells to an early developmental state in which they once again have the potential to become any other type of cell, enabling researchers to study normal biological processes, model diseases, and screen for…
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