As the Puget Sound region’s biotech industry continues to grow, Seattle Genetics is leading the pack with its therapeutic for lymphoma on the market and two more late-stage products for bladder and breast cancer on the way. “Seattle Genetics has reached a transformational point in its history,” CEO Clay Siegall told the Business Journal. “Seattle Genetics will remain focused on…
Read More
Researchers at Seattle Children’s Research Institute have discovered that populations of neurons in the brain stem have a previously unrecognized susceptibility to disruption by nicotine during early brain development. Published in the Journal of Comparative Neurology, their findings offer a clue to how nicotine exposure in utero could have a lasting effect on the brain’s wiring and give rise to negative outcomes like…
Read More

Studying Disease in a Dish

A new study by UW Medicine has identified a genetic link for some instances of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The study was the first of its kind to seek a tangible link between the mechanisms of a genetic mutation in the HADHA gene, which allows for fully functional fatty acid oxidation — a process in which fatty acids are broken down to produce…
Read More
Two hundred-billion red blood cells are renewed in our body every single day. These erythrocytes (also known as red blood cells) are generated from bi-potent megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitor cells during a maturation process called erythropoiesis. Erythropoiesis is controlled very tightly and defects in the key elements of this step-wise maturation can lead to life-threatening conditions such as severe anemia or myeloproliferative…
Read More

Chromosomes Are Safer with Stu2

The cell cycle, the biological process underlying how cells grow and multiply, is tightly regulated to ensure a faithful distribution of genetic material to ‘daughter’ cells. This tight regulation of cell division is essential to minimize erroneous partitioning of genetic material which can lead to genomic instability, a common hallmark of cancer. As such, the mechanisms that guide faithful segregation…
Read More
Researchers at the Baker Lab, part of the Institute for Protein Design (IPD), recently made a breakthrough in learning how proteins interact and co-evolve with each other to carry out biological functions. Postdoctoral fellow and project lead Qian Cong plans to continue using comparative genomics to study how proteins compose organisms. The scholars involved in this project are looking forward to applying computational…
Read More
Supplements of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (often sold as fish oil) do not help people with type 2 diabetes stave off chronic kidney disease, according to findings from the largest clinical study to date of the supplements in this patient population. The paper was published today in JAMA and presented concurrently at an American Society of Nephrology conference in Washington,…
Read More
Scientists are looking for 10,000 good dogs to take part in a 10-year effort aimed at tracking their health and identifying factors that can lengthen their lifespan. The pets that are selected for the Dog Aging Project could come in for some scientific pampering, including genome sequencing and health assessments. But that doesn’t mean the project’s organizers at the University…
Read More

Peter Skene: Transforming Outcomes for Patients

What causes immune disease such as diabetes, Crohn’s disease, and cancer? See how Peter Skene, director of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at the Allen Institute for Immunology is working to answer this question and transform outcomes for patients in this video produced by the Allen Institute.
Read More
By now, I’ve spoken to enough researchers to know that there isn’t one clear path into one’s respective field. People find their passion as early as elementary school or decades later. For Samira Moorjani, a research assistant professor at the UW, this journey started during her graduate school years. Moorjani majored in biomedical engineering as an undergraduate, and enjoyed working…
Read More