The University of Washington in Seattle is among eight U.S. research sites undertaking a study to confirm whether brain imaging can detect signs of autism spectrum disorder in infants. The National Institute of Mental Health, part of the National Institutes of Health, is funding the multicenter research with a five-year, $9.5 million grant. The study’s co-lead investigators are at the…
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EndoGastric Solutions, a medical technology company focused on acid reflux, has closed a $45 million financing round to grow the reach of its non-invasive treatment. The Series I round includes $30.5 million in funding that was announced last summer as well as a $14.5 million investment from Accelmed, a medical device investor. RELATED CONTENT Check out GeekWire’s list of recent Seattle and Pacific…
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PATH and Quansys Biosciences, Inc. have announced the launch of a new diagnostic tool designed to help researchers develop more sensitive and reliable malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and to support public health surveillance. The Q-Plex™ Human Malaria Array (5-Plex) is a quantitative immunoassay that simultaneously measures multiple malaria antigens. With almost half of the world’s population at risk for…
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Adaptive Biotechnologies, a high-flying startup that makes technology to read the human immune system, has officially filed to go public and seeks to raise $230 million from investors. Founded in 2009 by brothers Chad and Harlan Robins, Adaptive Biotechnologies is a leader among a crop of Seattle-based biotech ventures. The 346-person company previously raised more than $400 million to develop…
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The composition of the vaginal microbiome is an indicator of whether a woman will experience preterm birth, or carry the fetus full term, according to one of the largest studies of its kind.  The findings are published today in Nature Medicine. The microbiome is the collection of organisms growing in a particular location. The researchers on this project collected vaginal microbiome samples…
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Continuing a Legacy

Drs. Eddie Méndez and Ahmed Diab had been wrestling with words and data for weeks, trying to prepare a new manuscript for publication. But now they were running out of time. They were proud of the paper. It reported on an early-phase trial of a potential new drug to treat certain head and neck cancers, Méndez’s area of expertise as…
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Bacteria are everywhere. They live in the soil and water, on our skin and in our bodies. Some are pathogenic, meaning they cause disease or infection. To design effective treatments against pathogens, researchers need to know which specific genes are to blame for pathogenicity. Scientists can identify pathogenic genes through genetic engineering. This involves adding human-made DNA into a bacterial…
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Special Delivery: Gold Nanoparticles Ship CRISPR Cargo

Forget UPS and FedEx: Tiny golden delivery trucks created at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center can ship CRISPR into human blood stem cells, offering a potential way to treat diseases like HIV and sickle cell anemia. And the researchers behind those trucks have even bigger distribution dreams. Gene therapy — the editing of our DNA to treat disease — is…
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Meet Dr. Jay Shendure, a Seattle-based scientist and University of Washington professor. His team at the Brotman Baty Institute for Precision Medicine showed that it’s possible to sequence the complete genome of a fetus from samples obtained noninvasively from the parents. What do you do? I’m the scientific director for the Brotman Baty Institute for Precision Medicine — a collaboration between UW Medicine,…
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Researchers have discovered one way the bacterium that causes Legionnaires’ diseasesuccessfully lives in contaminated water supplies: by killing off its neighbors. The study, published today in the journal eLife by scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, reveals the unexpected molecular poison the bacterium uses to do so — and suggests a potential way to prevent an illness that strikes about 6,000 people each…
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